Replacing The Pessimistic ‘Narrator’ With An Optimistic One For Social Anxiety Disorder

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Let’s pinpoint some of the irrational thoughts that cross someones mind who experiences social anxiety disorder:

– Why am I so different than everyone else
– How will I gain peoples approval
– Why do people judge me negatively all the time
– How come everyone else seems so confident

Social anxiety sufferers go through life with this distorted view of reality each and everyday, but how come these anxious minds don’t process reality correctly? Deep down all we really want to do is say screw what people think i’m just going to be the person I am deep down. The question we must begin to ask ourselves is where does the root of all this fear come from? Where does this heightened feeling of self-consciousness come from? Well, i’m convinced that each and everyone of us has some degree of self-consciousness built in to us that begins showing up in our teenage years, due to the limited life experiences we had that fed our insecurities.

Outgrowing the past takes a deep sense of self confidence and acceptance of our flaws as well as our positives. This is where compliments come into play, compliments not from others but to ourselves on a daily basis. This comes in the form of audios we listen to, posted notes on our bathroom walls, and any other way to regularly come into contact with ideas that will contribute to stopping the cycle of insecurities that lead to social anxiety disorder. Combining this approach with consciously picking out a negative thought as it appears, and replacing it with your new belief that is being programmed into your subconscious was my path out of social anxiety disorder. This approach of filtering out certain thoughts will eventually make it easier to isolate irrational thoughts, and clear the default cycle of irrational thoughts that is causing you to experience social anxiety.

My personal recovery through social anxiety disorder began after I made a decision to stop looking for processed chemicals to put in my body, and use more natural and earthly ways to accommodate this new approach I had of getting to the root of my problem. But for many years I like many others who suffer from social anxiety disorder thought of myself as being stupid while fear overtook my life, even though deep down my desires were completely opposite of what I was feeling. I felt more like an alien rather than a human being, fearfully floating through life day after day while the process of depersonalization played it’s role, doing my best to look ‘normal’ to others. But this kind of daily effort made me realize that I was masking my uniqueness to this world in many ways. This world truly needs you because there is only one of you, and whether someone else thinks something you say is ‘normal’ or not, you need to say it and take action towards things you truly want to do in this life and believe in.

It’s time to stop living a life filled with fear in other peoples shadows, begin giving yourself the well deserved feedback you truly deserve and end your social anxiety disorder once and for all starting today.

Pick up your free copy of the popular Anxiety Reducer Game Plan at http://www.anxietyend.com and begin lessening your anxiety levels today.

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4 comments on “Replacing The Pessimistic ‘Narrator’ With An Optimistic One For Social Anxiety Disorder

  1. “Deep down all we really want to do is say screw what people think i’m just going to be the person I am deep down. ”

    Not what I say … It’s “How can I be the person I want to be without compromising any opportunities…(being who I want to be at no cost.)

    I don’t want to screw what people think! … I want to maximize my involvement with then… not like I’m the only person in the world… I need these people to get what I want!

  2. Pingback: My Social Anxiety | Anna Deeds, LPC

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